Search

Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

Search Results for All:
(Showing results 1 to 2 of 2)



The Role of Continuous Intraday Electricity Markets: The Integration of Large-Share Wind Power Generation in Denmark

Fatih Karanfil and Yuanjing Li

Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.38.2.fkar
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper suggests an innovative idea to examine the functionality of an intraday electricity market by testing causality among its fundamental components. Using Danish and Nordic data, it investigates the main drivers of the price difference between the intraday and day-ahead markets, and causality between wind forecast errors and their counterparts. Our results show that the wind and conventional generation forecast errors significantly cause the intraday price to differ from the day-ahead price, and that the relative intraday price decreases with the unexpected amount of wind generation. Cross-border electricity exchanges are found to be important to handle wind forecast errors. Additionally, some zonal differences with respect to both causality and impulse responses are detected. This paper provides the first evidence on the persuasive functioning of the intraday market in the case of Denmark, whereby intermittent production deviations are effectively reduced, and wind forecast errors are jointly handled through the responses from demand, conventional generation, and intraday international electricity trade.



Polypropylene Price Dynamics: Input Costs or Downstream Demand?

Lurion M. De Mello and Ronald D. Ripple

Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.38.4.ldem
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper investigates price dynamics between polypropylene (PP), propylene, naphtha, and crude oil together with proxies representing PP using industries. We test the dynamics in the South East Asian and North Western European markets. The paper is motivated due to the importance of the propylene and PP market in various downstream industries and importantly to aid producers in having a better understanding of how input costs and demand drive the prices. We employ a vector error correction framework, which facilitates testing different dynamics among the upstream and downstream prices. We find PP prices in both regions to be endogenous, albeit with some evolution over time, i.e., input costs and downstream demand factors tend to drive PP prices. In both regional markets shocks to naphtha and oil prices tend to be driven mostly by each other's price with little effect originating from PP and propylene prices.





Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

 

© 2020 International Association for Energy Economics | Privacy Policy | Return Policy