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Some General-Equilibrium Considerations for the Analysis of Oil Import Restrictions

Knot Anton Mork

Year: 1987
Volume: Volume 8
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol8-No4-7
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Abstract:
Recent events in the oil market and the persistent U.S. government deficit have sparked renewed interest in a tax or a tariff on oil. I have argued elsewhere (Mork, 1985) for such taxation from the perspective of macroeconomic stability. However, quite often the argument is based on the simple static notion that an oil import tariff will soften the world oil market and improve the terms of trade.



Long-Term Contracts for Crude Oil imports into Costa Rica: A General Equilibrium Analysis

Christian Dufournaud, Carlos Raul Gutierrez, Lodetrijk Berlage, and Peter P. Rogerst

Year: 1989
Volume: Volume 10
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol10-No1-10
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Abstract:
Energy is critical for all human activity. Many countries import a major proportion of essential energy resources such as oil, for which the ability to substitute alternative inputs is difficult in both the short and long run. A possible response to the prospect that energy prices can fluctuate is for governments to negotiate long-term contracts with suppliers to mitigate sudden price shocks. This strategy is, however, not cost-free. It is equally rational for suppliers to negotiate high prices which protect them from the prospect of having to supply their oil at a lower price than they could anticipate in the future. A country seeking long-term protection from unstable oil prices via long-term contracts, therefore, faces higher current prices.



Growth and Welfare Losses from Carbon Emissions Restrictions: A General Equilibrium Analysis for Egypt

Charles Blitzer, Richard Eckaus, Supriya Lahiri, and Alexander Meeraus

Year: 1993
Volume: Volume 14
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol14-No1-3
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Abstract:
This paper assesses the economic effects of carbon emission restrictions in Egypt.Like other studies, it is an exemplification of some of the economic possibilitiesunder various conditions. However, it extends the domain of possibilities andsuggests some issues that have not been considered in other studies.It is demonstrated clearly that, while annual emissions constraints have only a modest effect on long-run economic growth rates, they have substantial effect on the achieved levels of GDP and welfare. These results do not change much, even with backstop and unconventional technologies or change in discounting. However, postponing the imposition of constraints does have a significant effect, as does changing the form of the constraints to one based on accumulated emissions.





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