Search

Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

Search Results for All:
(Showing results 1 to 2 of 2)



Addressing Key Drivers of Regional CO2 Emissions of the Manufacturing Industry in Japan

Ken’ichi Matsumoto, Yosuke Shigetomi, Hiroto Shiraki, Yuki Ochi, Yuki Ogawa, and Tomoki Ehara

Year: 2019
Volume: Volume 40
Number: The New Era of Energy Transition
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.40.SI1.kmat
View Abstract

Abstract:
This study investigated the factors behind the historical changes in CO2 emissions of the Japanese manufacturing industry as a whole and by sector at the prefectural level. We decomposed the changes of CO2 emissions in 47 prefectures from 1990 to 2013 into four factors (carbon intensity, energy intensity, structure, and activity effects) using the logarithmic mean Divisia index method. We found that energy intensity, structure, and activity effects were more influential in the changes of emissions than the carbon intensity effect, although the most influential factor varied by prefecture. Among the eight considered industrial sectors of Japan's manufacturing industry, the changes in the chemistry and metal sectors were particularly complex. Thus, improvements of the energy intensity and production in these two sectors should be prioritized. We also conducted detailed analysis of the decomposed factors in three selected prefectures based on cluster analysis.



The Impact of Renewable Energy Generation on the Spot Market Price in Germany: Ex-Post Analysis using Boosting Method

Alexander Ryota Keeley, Ken’ichi Matsumoto, Kenta Tanaka, Yogi Sugiawan, and Shunsuke Managi

Year: 2020
Volume: Volume 41
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.41.SI1.akee
View Abstract

Abstract:
This study combines regression analysis with machine learning analysis to study the merit order effect of renewable energy focusing on German market, the largest market in Europe with high renewable energy penetration. The results show that electricity from wind and solar sources reduced the spot market price by 9.64 €/MWh on average during the period from 2010 to 2017. Wind had a relatively stable impact across the day, ranging from 5.88 €/MWh to 8.04 €/MWh, while the solar energy impact varied greatly across different hours, ranging from 0.24 €/MWh to 11.78 €/MWh and having a stronger impact than wind during peak hours. The results also show characteristics of the interactions between renewable energy and spot market prices, including the slightly diminishing merit order effect of renewable energy at high generation volumes. Finally, a scenario-based analysis illustrates how different proportions of wind and solar energies affect the spot market price.





Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

 

© 2022 International Association for Energy Economics | Privacy Policy | Return Policy